2014 Summer Workshop

 May 15-17, 2014

Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, Utah State University; Logan, Utah.

The annual QSPS Summer Workshop takes place in a selective setting in which 10 to 15 participants each have one hour to present and discuss research. This format and selective setting facilitates in-depth peer feedback, while interacting extensively with other workshop participants and guests.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Botond Koszegi is a Professor of Economics at Central European University in Budapest, HungaryHe currently serves as a managing editor of the Review of Economic Studies, as an associate editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association, and as a board editor of the American Economic Review. His research focuses on behavioral economic modeling with specific application to self-control problems, non-constant discounting, reference-dependent preferences, and contracting when individuals are vulnerable because of behavioral characteristics. Botond has published his research in peer-reviewed journals such as the American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of EconomicsJournal of Public EconomicsTheoretical EconomicsJournal of the European Economic AssociationJournal of Health Economics, and Economic Theory, among many other outlets.

Andrew Samwick is the Sandra L. and Aruthur L. Irving '72a, P'10 Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College, and he is the Director of The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth College. Andrew is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on the Board of Directors of the National Tax Association. He also serves as an editor of Economics Letters. Andrew has studied social security reform, portfolio choice, precautionary saving, taxation, and executive compensation, among many other topics. He has published his research in peer-reviewed outlets such as the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of FinanceJournal of Monetary Economics, Journal of Public EconomicsReview of Economics and StatisticsJournal of Development Economics, Journal of Corporate Finance, National Tax Journal, and Contemporary Economic Policy, among many others.

CALL FOR PAPERS:

The Quantitative Society for Pensions and Saving (QSPS) invites the submission of theoretical, computational, and/or empirical research papers that examine various aspects of life-cycle decision making. Workshop topics typically include (but are not necessarily limited to) the following areas of life-cycle decision making:

  • Consumption, saving, labor supply, health status, health investment.
  • Public and private pension design/reform, and related issues such as annuitization.
  • Rational and/or behavioral models of life-cycle decision making.
  • Distribution of income and wealth as a function of age.
  • Demographic transitions in the age and skill structure of the population.
  • Debt, borrowing, default, mortgage contracts, housing choices, uncertainty about future income.
  • Education and human capital accumulation, intertemporal issues concerning risk and insurance.
  • Methods for computing life-cycle and overlapping-generations models in partial equilibrium or general equilibrium.

SUBMISSION OF PAPERS:

Send papers (pdf format) via email to T. Scott Findley. The deadline for submission is March 15, 2014. Full, although not necessarily finished, papers are required for submission; abstracts alone will not be considered. Submitted papers will be reviewed by the QSPS Program Committee and participation decisions will be communicated shortly after the submission deadline.

FEES:

No submission and registration fees are required.

LOCATION:

Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, Utah State University, Logan, Utah. Visitors enjoy world-class scenery just minutes from campus. Easy access to hiking, biking, fishing, camping, boating and other sight-seeing opportunities in the mountains. Logan is truly an outdoor paradise for those who are enthusiastic about the mountains, providing everything from gentle nature trails along rivers and lakes to extreme challenges on some of the steepest slopes in the Rockies.